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In which I compare myself to a starfleet captain, wear my scars proudly, and embrace the benefits that come with an artist revisiting old work.

In particular, the work of which you’re the LEAST proud.

San Francisco Theater Pub

Charles Lewis III is revisiting old demons.

skeleton-in-closet-1

“We teach people how to remember, we never teach them how to grow.”
– Oscar Wilde, The Critic as Artist

About a week or so back, our esteemed Executive Director Stuart Bousel mentioned on Facebook that he’d recently come across an old script he’d written. From the way he described it, he’d put the script aside after a particularly disastrous reading and hadn’t thought much of it since. However, after stumbling upon it again and looking it over, he was relieved to find that the problem wasn’t with the script, but with the way it was read. It was one of those pleasant scenarios that artists hope for happens only upon reflection: to find out that your work wasn’t nearly as bad as you’d thought and that problem was how it was presented.

I’ve been thinking of that a lot the past few…

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